CAW President Addresses CAW Council

December 3, 2010


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CAW President Addresses CAW Council

CAW President Addresses CAW Council
dated December 3, 2010


Toronto, Ontario
December 3, 2010
      

Toronto, Ontario
December 3, 2010



 

Ken Lewenza
CAW National President

       "The unemployment numbers are out this morning for November and the unemployment rate is down to 7.6 per cent from 7.9. Before we get excited though, this is entirely because of a surge in part time jobs. The term is part-time, but the term in the CAW today is precarious work. There were 26,700 new part time jobs created but we lost 11,500 full time jobs which is absolutely terrible. Over all there were 15,200 new jobs created, all of them part time. No full time jobs were created in the month of November. When I raise those unemployment numbers, our opportunities in the future to come up with an economic plan, an economic plan that's an alternative to the existing plan, that talks about job creation, full time job creation, job opportunities for our members. And for us to realize our dream of having a full time job, of having a job that you could raise a family in, having a job that you could send your kids to school in, having a job that you can retire in dignity, continues to be the goal and objectives of the CAW and most Canadians in this country. Why do I raise the unemployment so significantly this morning is because when you go into collective bargaining, regardless of what community you go into, if you have high unemployment the expectations of the community is "You should be lucky to have a job". In fact, in some of our work places today bargaining committee members, under pressure, are signing collective agreements of the status quo. Some are naturally based on the circumstances of that particular bargaining committee, but in general most people are saying "You are lucky to have a job." So all of us have a responsibility to continue to fight for jobs. All of us have a responsibility, at a time if there is excessive over time to limit that over time and fight for full time jobs. In the Ontario Legislature, Finance Minister Dwight Duncan gets up and says in the house, listen on a public policy mechanism we would ask the union and the employers in the public sector to come together and in the next two years have wage freezes as a co-operative environment verses a confrontational environment. Did the Liberal government of the province of Ontario get criticized once again for asking public sector workers to consider wage restraints for the next couple of years? Yes they have. But who have they been criticized by? It's by the opposition party and Tim Hudak. And today Tim Hudak is a Tory. A Mike Harris Tory. And Tim Hudak today is leading in the polls in the province of Ontario. And Tim Hudak is as dangerous as a Premier as Mike Harris. The success that we have had in the last seven or eight years in terms of social spending, in terms of the support that we have had for the auto industry, every single social benefit or job creation measure by this government has been attacked by the provincial Tories. In fact, the provincial Tories have stood up in the House and said to Mr. Duncan, you don't have the guts to take on unions. You don't have the guts to say to the public sector why the hell they should have security when the private sector has insecurity. They don't talk about services they try to divide private sector jobs against public sector jobs and we can't allow that to happen."



CAW Fighting Back Makes A Difference.


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