CAW Auto Parts No Concession Policy Endorsed

St. Thomas, Ontario

November 14, 2005


Please note that you will need a copy of RealPlayer installed on your computer in order to view the following video file(s).

Download a RealMedia version (.rm)



CAW Auto Parts No Concession Policy Endorsed
CAW Auto Parts No Concession Policy Endorsed
dated November 14, 2005

November 11, 2005
St. Thomas, Ontario

       In the wake of the massive concession demands in the Delphi bankruptcy in the U.S. the Canadian Auto Workers union has taken a stand to fight any concession demands in the auto parts sector in Canada. Shop floor leaders from auto parts plants in the CAW endorsed a "no concessions" policy and a seven point plan to fight concessions, during a meeting in St Thomas, Ontario, Nov. 11th.


Buzz Hargrove
CAW national president

       "No one is raising their hand, everyone else is sitting so I want to declare that this is a unanimous decision of the auto parts sector of the union and I want to congratulate each and every one of you."

       The shop floor leadership vowed to not walk backwards when faced with concession demands from their employers. CAW national president Buzz Hargrove told the workers the "no concessions" stance will strengthen the industry not weaken it.

Buzz Hargrove
CAW national president

       "We want to, in our bargaining, bargain intelligently, including making sure that we do what is necessary to have our plants productive. Business as usual is not acceptable. Feather bedding is not acceptable. Where there are rules that limit our ability to make our plants and our workplaces productive then the bargaining committees have an obligation to come to grips with those issues. Productivity and quality are the only things that can guarantee that we are not going to be caught in the squeeze."
       "We're not just negative, that we really do want to ensure that not only do we maintain our wages and benefits, but that we maintain and improve the job security of our members and we do that by working closely with the companies on issues of productivity and quality."


       Hargrove laid the blame for the current woes of the auto sector squarely on the shoulders the rising Canadian dollar, the federal government's failure to develop a fair trade auto policy, unfair trade from Japan and Korea and the refusal of transplant companies to buy Canadian.

 

Buzz Hargrove
CAW national president

       "I'm getting tired of hearing the Japanese say, "well if they only built the quality." We build the best quality products in the world. They don't want to buy them because they buy them from their home plants in Japan or their family of companies that they brought with them to the United States. It's time they started recognizing the skills and quality of Canadian workers and we have to demand that."

       In regards to the Delphi situation in the U.S., CAW council president Ken Lewenza and Hargrove both vowed support for the United Auto Workers union in their fight against concessions.

Ken Lewenza
CAW Council president

       "Our message is to the United Auto Workers, we will stand hand in hand, solidarity from one country to another, rejecting the corporate agenda that attacks workers' rights, kills communities and kills the hopes and aspirations of union members."


Buzz Hargrove
CAW national president

       "This is one period of time when there has to be complete solidarity, as Ken Lewenza said, across the border, to try and assist one another as we go through one of the greatest crisis's, as the next two or three years unfold, that this industry has ever faced in its history."

CAW "Fighting Back Makes a Difference."


Print Print  Send to a friend Send to a friend  Feedback Feedback